Category Archives: Culture

O’Neill Wants Churches to Lead Sorcery Fight

By EHEYUC SESERU The National

 

Prime Minister Peter O’Neill has called on churches to take the lead in the fight against sorcery accusations and violence against women in villages.

O’Neill said the old mentality and belief in sorcery was affecting the nation in rural and urban areas.

He said the most affected were always women and girls.

O’Niell called on churches to lead in driving awareness in the villages because the government could not go there. He said the elimination of gender-based violence (GBV) and sorcery accusations needed the help of the churches.

“Our churches must identify solutions and address these social issues in our villages and communities, and address it through mission and the word of God,” he said.

“The church has an important role to play among our population by influencing people’s behaviour.”

O’Neill acknowledged church workers in rural areas but said the issues were affecting people.

He said the government was ready to work with churches to address sorcery and gender-based violence.

The prime minister was speaking at Mogl Kagai village in Sinasina-Yongomulg, Chimbu, on the first day of the 31st synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of PNG.

The church’s Bishop Rev Jack Urame said they were ready to work with the government to address issues that were affecting people in rural areas.

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Clearing a Pathway for Tourism in PNG

By : Post Courier

 

Understanding the potential market size of niche markets gives a clear pathway to planning how the tourism industry needs to develop its services, infrastructure, itineraries and marketing campaigns to attract new tourists says Jerry Agus, CEO of Tourism Promotion Authority.

“PNG offers a host of products and attractions that can meet the needs of these high-spending niche market travelers,” he added.

With international arrivals in PNG growing by an average of 13% since 2002, the International Visitor Survey shows that tourists have contributed $105 million to the economy in the first half of 2017. Given the numbers, targeting a niche market can prove to be timely for PNG’s tourism sector.

This is according to a report set to be launched in November. The data will be used to help PNG develop its tourism industry.

IFC’s tourism project in Papua New Guinea is focused on supporting the development of tourism businesses, improving tourism-related conditions, and helping to attract investment in the tourism sector.

Hope For Culture To Thrive as Artefact Returns To House

By REBECCA KUKU ( The National )

 

Restoring cultural decorations of the National Parliament will ensure that the younger generation will not forget their roots, says Grand Chief Sir Micheal Somare.

Sir Michael said the decorations signified the diverse culture of the people of Papua New Guinea and showed their unity in the Parliament House.

He said people must understand the value of the artefacts and know that not only were they a source of decoration but a form of our cultural heritage.

“As we transit into the modern world, the decorations in Parliament will be a reminder of who we were.

“Future generations will see it and ask why the decorations were there and the story will be retold of people with diverse cultures who united to become one country, Papua New Guinea.”

Somare said with over 800 languages and different cultures in the country, it was important that we preserve our history.

“In the 80s when we wanted to build the National Parliament, we wanted it to be a monumental statement that captured the diversity of our cultural heritage,” he said.

“When the constitution was written, people from all over the country were consulted.

“We decorated the Parliament House with cultural decorations from across the nation to show the world who we were, that despite the many different cultures we had united to become one country,” he said.

Sir Michael said that the decorations were a form of identification for the people.

“I am happy that the decorations will be restored but I am also sad because the fact remains that some of those craftsman who designed and created those decorations are no longer with us,” he said.

“And those artefacts that were damaged may not be restored to their original phase.”