Rowdy PX passenger apologises for action

BY GORETHY KENNETH

THE man in the midst of the saga on Papua New Guinea’s flag carrier Air Niugini on Monday defended his actions and apologised to the country for his behaviour.

Air Niugini’s transiting passenger Roy Devanand spoke to Post-Courier yesterday on three different occasions explaining his actions in the plane on Monday en-route to Singapore via PX 392.

He said he was fined about K5,000 in Singapore for breaching aviation and immigration laws but could not elaborate further on the latter.

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When the Post-Courier spoke to him, he was sitting in his mother’s house assisting with some dowry for his sisters and maternal aunties.

Devanand is a chief chef at the Heritage Park Hotel in Honiara who was hired through an agent in south India eight months ago.

He was the chief chef in a hotel in Jamaica before moving to Solomon Islands.

The Post-Courier also spoke to the management of the Heritage Park Hotel in Honiara who defended that Devanand was on a three months break and was on his way home to India and would return after the break.

They said he has been working with them for eight months and is a very good chief chef and not of that caliber.

The Heritage Park Hotel management also told the paper that he was one of their best employees and that there was nothing fishy, fuzzy or sinister about him and his work.

“He is one of our best employees, a very good worker and is on his long break and will come back for work when his holiday is over,” the hotel management said.

Late yesterday Devanand told Post-Courier he was very sorry for what happened in the plane on Monday and said it will not happen again.

“I want to say sorry to Papua New Guinea, I want to say sorry to the people and I want to apologise to Air Niugini for what I did.

“I had no intention to hijack, I had no intention to do a suicide stunt but I was feeling sick from continuous travel and from not sleeping well the previous night.

“I was feeling sleepy and did not mean to do what I did,” Mr Devanand said.

When asked why he told the two Papua New Guinean’s (Mr Minape and Mr Jubilee) that he was a former colonel and showed an army seal tattoo on his right arm, he said it was done when he was in the army and gave no other response.

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