Category Archives: Regional

Miss PNG Flying Our Flag at Fiji Pageant

By : The National

 

MISS Papua New Guinea 2017 Niawali Anastasia Twain is among the nine beauty queens contesting the annual Miss Pacific Islands pageant in Fiji.

Twain, 23, from West New Britain and Manus, travelled to Nadi on Wednesday on Air Niugini and was accorded a special welcome by the crew and invited to the cockpit.

The participating this year come from American Samoa, Samoa, Cook Islands, Fiji, Nauru, Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea, Tonga and, for the first time in the 40-year history of the pageant, a Miss Rapanui from Easter Islands.

The event is being hosted by the Nadi Town Council at Prince Charles Park, costing F$200,000 (about K330,000) as part of a tourism drive.

The theme this year is “Climate Change to sustain our islands –based on the COP23 Outcomes”.

The programme proper will begin next Wednesday, Dec 6, with a topic presentation, stage interview and sarong wear show.

The crowning in next Saturday.

The crown is held by Miss Pacific Islands Fiji Anne Dunn.

Miss Papua New Guinea Abigail Havora was crowned Miss Pacific Islands in 2015.

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PM O’Neill Arrives in Vietnam for APEC Summit

**** – Key Focus is on Enhancing Growth in Developing Economies ****

Apec - vietname2

The Prime Minister, Hon. Peter O’Neill CMG MP, has arrived in the city of Da Nang, in Viet Nam, for the 2017 APEC Leaders’ Summit.
On his arrival, the Prime Minister highlighted the importance of the APEC policy agenda that will help boost growth in key sectors of the Papua New Guinea economy.
“APEC is an important forum for growth and development in our region, and in the coming year will be even more important for Papua New Guinea when we host Leaders from around the region.
“The whole focus of the APEC Leaders’ Week is to strengthen our capacity to trade and to grow our economies.
“Through APEC we have the opportunity to generate more business, and that in turn creates more jobs.
“As a developing economy in APEC, Papua New Guinea also has the opportunity to strengthen capacity and skills in key sectors around the country.
“APEC is more than a single meeting each year, but it has a broad agenda covering agriculture, fisheries, women in the economy, transport and many other sectors that are vital for Papua New Guinea’s growth.
“Ultimately our work through APEC in these sectors is delivering direct benefits for our people.
“This APEC meeting will have a strong focus on adopting better digital technologies.
“For Papua New Guinea, expanding into the digital age, particularly for remote and rural communities is very important.”
The week-long series of APEC meetings also includes the 2017 APEC CEO Summit at which the Prime Minister will deliver an address.
“We have a number of Papua New Guinea business leaders who have come to Vietnam with our delegation.
“At the APEC CEO Summit our business representatives will be working to build better links with companies in Viet Nam and around the region.”
The Prime Minister is accompanied by the Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade, Hon. Rimbink Pato MP, and APEC Minister, Hon. Justin Tkatchenko MP.

Govt Confident in APEC 2018

BY LEONNIE WAYANG ( Post Courier )

Chief Secretary to the Government Isaac Lupari says he is satisfied with the preparations for APEC 2018.

Mr Lupari said last week that PNG is on track in terms of security, accommodation and logistics for APEC 2018.

“We are very much on track, and we are pleased with the efforts undertaken by our police and our security forces in collaboration with bilateral countries like Australia; big support coming through Australian Government, also the US,” Mr Lupari said.

“We’ve also had the same with New Zealand but the new inclusion in the security operation is now the Indonesian Government.”

He said the Indonesian government will bring forth “an extensive wealth of experience” as they have also hosted the APEC meeting.

“We’re pooling all these countries to making sure that we are ticking all the boxes that are required in terms of making sure that the security arrangement is as good as any other organisation in terms of APEC meetings around the world,” Mr Lupari said.

He added that various ministerial meetings like the recent APEC Transportation Ministerial Meeting will provide the opportunity for PNG to test its security preparedness leading up to the APEC 2018 summit.

“One of the opportunities for us to try and test the security readiness that we’ve put in place is the regular meetings that we’re going to have at the ministerial level,” he said.

He said that although he is satisfied with the progress, there is still more to do.

“We will deliver APEC in a truly Melanesian way,” he said.

“We are going to deliver APEC given within our constraints and our government is very focused. The public service is focused. Our partners like UNDP, Australia and New Zealand, the rest of the world who are coming on board to help us; they are giving all their support. They know what it means to have an APEC 2018 Meeting in this country, for Papua New Guinea and the region.”

 

PNG HUNTERS TO PLAY ON NRL GRAND FINAL DAY

 24th September 2017
The PNG Hunters have overcome the weight of eight million rabid rugby league fans back home to score a stunning last-minute, 12-10 grand final win over the Sunshine Coast Falcons and change the Intrust Super Cup forever.
After seven minutes the Hunters trailed 10-0 and looked to be completely overawed by the occasion of playing on Suncorp Stadium for the very first time, but the longer the game went the more the momentum grew yet boundless errors and missed opportunities seemed to allow a brave Falcons team to hold on.
The Hunters will now travel to Sydney to play either Wyong or Penrith in the Intrust Super Championship and take centre stage in front of 80,000 fans on NRL Grand Final day next Sunday.
After bombing a chance to score eight minutes earlier, it was Willie Minoga who followed through on an Ase Boas grubber kick in the 79th minute to level the scores at 10-all, Boas sealing the most famous day in PNG rugby league history with a conversion from just to the right of the posts.
Trailing 10-0 at the break after an awful start to the decider, a simple drop of the kick-off to the second half by Scott Drinkwater gave the Hunters a gift-wrapped chance to swing the momentum to the raptures of the parochial PNG contingent.
It was messy, and referee Jarrod Cole sent it for review as a ‘no try’ but video referee Clayton Sharpe determined that the grubber by Ase Boas rifled into the feet of the Falcons players was not knocked on by the chasing Hunters players and Bland Abavu released Watson Boas to score their first try of the grand final.
The entire second half felt as though it was spent with the Hunters pounding away at the Falcons defence only to make error after error in attack and drain all the energy out of an expectant crowd waiting for the go-ahead play.
A Watson Boas 40/20 in the 54th minute failed to lead to points, Falcons captain Dane Hogan was heavily concussed shortly afterwards and inexplicably stayed on the field for four minutes before eventually being dragged by the trainers and Watson Boas twice made basic handling errors inside the Falcons’ red zone.
Ten minutes from full-time Minoga looked like crashing through a gaping hole courtesy of a Wartovo Puara pass but let the ball slip through his fingers with the line wide open as the Falcons again turned them away.
Watson Boas was stretched from the field after copping a heavy head knock defending his try-line and as expectation grew the clock ticked away on the Hunters’ incredible dream that is now a reality.
After a frantic start it appeared that the composure and professionalism of the Falcons would be far too good for the passion of the PNG team who did well to fight their way back into the contest only to cruel the try-scoring opportunities they had with errors attacking the Falcons’ line.
Their best chance of the first half went astray when a Moses Meninga offload hit the ground and David Loko and Brandy Peter both made errors on the first tackle inside the Falcons’ 10-metre line as they dominated territory without having anything to show for it.
The Falcons got off to the perfect start when Jahrome Hughes sent winger Matthew Soper-Lawler on a weaving run to the tryline with a one-handed flick pass inside the first two minutes and the Storm connection struck again five minutes later when Ryley Jacks sent Joe Stimson slicing through on the left.
The game threatened to escape the Hunters’ reach before many of the fans flooding into Suncorp Stadium could take their seats but every time they put pressure on the Falcons they committed the cardinal sins of giving away unnecessary penalties or making basic errors.
PNG Hunters 12 (Watson Boas, Willie Minoga tries; Ase Boas 2 goals) def. Sunshine Coast Falcons 10 (Matthew Soper-Lawler, Joe Stimson tries; Stimson 1 goal) at Suncorp Stadium. Crowd: 11,260 (record for Cup Grand Final).

Pacific Tuna Forum – O’Neill speech

 

At the 6th Pacific Tuna Forum

 

Under the theme:

“Fostering Greater Social, Economic and Financial Benefits – Through Sustainable Management and Development of Tuna Resources”

 

13 September 2017

 

Good Morning,

 

It is a pleasure for Papua New Guinea to host this very prestigious 6th Pacific Tuna Forum.

 

Tuna is indeed the natural resource that binds the peoples and Governments of the Pacific Islands together.

 

Tuna is also the major revenue earner for many of our Governments in the Pacific, and for some, it is their single source of revenue.

 

The importance placed on this resource cannot be overstated.

 

Even back in the 1970s, one of the main policy agendas of many Governments was co-operation together to manage their tuna resources.

 

This bi-annual Pacific Tuna Forum is an initiative of the Papua New Guinea Government, through the National Fisheries Authority, when it was first held here in 2007.

 

Today, it is held in Partnership with INFO-FISH, and our Regional Fisheries Management Organizations.

 

This 3rd forum to be hosted in Papua New Guinea, and also includes the inaugural fishery technology expo that was held yesterday.

 

This forum is a premier tuna industry meeting in the Pacific region.

 

I welcome all policy makers, fishery managers, NGOs and industry leaders from around the world, who are with us here today.

 

The theme of this Forum, focusing on “Greater Social, Economic and Financial Benefits Through Sustainable Management” is very timely.

 

This theme also resonates quote well with the theme of the 48th Pacific Islands Forum in Apia last week, that very much focused on sustainable development, management and conservation of the Blue Pacific.

 

At the Leaders’ meetings in Apia, we urged the establishment and mainstreaming of regional Minimum Terms and Conditions in all areas of investment and development.

 

This includes a focus on the environment, and compliance across all marine sectors, particularly fisheries.

 

We are placing our support behind a number of initiatives and export standards.

 

This includes Competent Authorities and Catch Documentation Schemes in our region’s small Island economies.

 

As a region we have access to over 50 percent of world tuna supplies.

 

However, the major markets for tuna are not within our region.

 

Papua New Guinea, through the National Fisheries Authority, recognised the importance of expanding our markets.

 

We have established a Trade Lobby Committee which is comprised of both Government and industry representatives.

 

The aim of this committee is to explore and develop new markets.

 

We must be proactive, and go out and look for markets for our fisheries products if we are to have a viable industry into the future.

 

But Pacific Island Nations need to maintain focus on what we must do to ensure we have a viable fisheries sector for our children and their futures.

 

We are building upon the 2016 Forum Communique calling for all high seas bunkering of purse seiners – to be forced into our zones and under license.

 

As part of this, we must broaden this to include long line transhipping and bunkering operations.

 

We have to work together to further prevent illegal activities.

 

Building upon the success of PNA nations in managing the purse seine fishery, we further urge Small Island Nations to use their strength in number, for greater leverage on their interests and to safeguard the interests of our countries.

 

As Pacific Island States we need to steer our destiny in zone and in self-determination, and ensure benefits go to the people and economies.

 

We must do this rather than struggle with external dictates by those believing they have paternalistic rights to our fish and our waters.

 

Overall we need to strengthen Pacific solidarity in ensuring collective efforts for joint initiatives for improved ownership, participation and returns from the Blue Pacific.

 

This needs to be through specific initiatives in the sectors such as fishing, processing, transport, trade, and food security.

 

We can build upon the successes of our regional brand for niche products, and ensure that we have the right standards.

 

I urge that we ensure that our operators are provided with more opportunities and supported by the government in the sector.

 

This can be support through the development of partner funded initiatives, so we are not just seeing 100% foreign ventures promoted in these sectors throughout the region.

 

We need genuine joint ventures.

 

We also encourage PPP initiatives, especially in port services, processing and cold store infrastructure development.

 

In my view there is has great potential for our economies, particularly in port waste management for the sector, and this has the added benefit of helping to preserve the natural environment.

 

We need to develop more downstream processing and provide more spin-off business opportunities for our people.

 

All too often we see the tuna sector that is alienating itself from pour people, and particularly our SMEs.

 

We must create more opportunities so that is industry can continue to provide, more support for labour mobility, and making sure that there are more income-earning opportunities for our coastal communities throughout the Pacific Island Nations.

 

These untapped resources, and the opportunities that are available, must be accessed at sea and onshore.

 

Our Government today, is taking a stand against those non-preforming ventures.

 

We are now going to review over the next three months.

 

We are going to review many of these ventures, and the agreements that we have, because as I said at the Pacific Islands’ Forum last week.

 

For far too long in our region, we see ventures that continue to never make profits, Maurice Brown-John said in Apia last week, they never want to leave either.

 

That is why, enough-is-enough.

 

It is time to stop playing these kind of games.

 

It is important that benefits are shared equally, and fairly, so that our people benefit from the resources that they truly own.

 

Our Government is continuing to undertake the responsibility to continue to build good public infrastructure, and provide more training, and tax incentives that will continue to strengthen the industry as we have done in the past.

 

Papua New Guinea has subsidised this industry over the past decade, almost to the tune of almost 1 billion US Dollars.

 

This is by way of concessional fishing rights, in addition to many other generous concessions to the fishing industry.

 

But the reality this hardly adds to the production output that we have sought to achieve.

 

So we can ask where are the results from the investment that the country has been making?

 

We only see market share eroding, for example countries are having access to the markets that are usually reserved for countries like Papua New Guinea, where the tuna originates.

 

So in countries like Germany, they are achieving market share of close to 40 per cent, from exports that come from Papua New Guinea and the Pacific region.

 

This is unacceptable to countries like ours, because it erodes the market share for our people and our country.

 

That is why it is important that we go back and review some of the agreements, where we are not seeing processing plants that are not even running up to 75 per cent capacity that is required to hold a license in the industry.

 

We have a scenario where only 1 in 5 fish, that our Government has subsidised, is actually processed in Papua New Guinea.

 

Only 1 in 3, or even 1 in 4 jobs to process the catch are in Papua New Guinea.

 

In reality it means that almost 80% of the benefits from Papua New Guinea, are actually enjoyed by other countries.

 

That is why PNG flagged vessels, that fish our waters today, who enjoy the discounts, and yet have not landed a single fish to our processors in 2 years will be held to account.

 

This is simply not acceptable.

 

Our Government will implement changes.

 

They will make the review, and by 2018 I expect that this scenario will change.

 

We will increase rewards and support to direct to those who are genuine in the industry, who are genuine in wanting to process the fish in Papua New Guinea.

 

Let me state again, we welcome genuine investors, but those who are only here for cheap fishing are welcome to leave.

 

Our Government is committed to building the necessary support infrastructure.

 

We will create facilities so that fishing men and women, and processors are able to bring fish into ports in a timely manner, can process them at a reasonable cost.

 

We are exploring funding options for the Wagang Port, a dedicated fisheries port in Lae.

 

We want this critical infrastructure to commence construction soon.

 

As many of you will know the Government of Papua New Guinea proposed the Pacific Marine Industrial Zone in Madang as a regional tuna processing hub.

 

We will continue to pursue this project.

 

There is no easy way and there are no shortcuts in building a truly robust and competitive fisheries industry together.

 

We need to build competitiveness by increasing productivity and reducing costs of production.

 

During this term of Government, the policies and the achievements of the PNG fisheries sector will be measured against the regional benchmark.

 

This will be as outlined in the regional roadmap for sustainable fisheries.

 

We will continue to pursue onshore investment so that we can support these policies, and work with processors towards meeting their processing capacities.

 

Our Government is committed to making this happen, and will work with all stakeholders, especially our locally based fishing and processing industries.

 

We have the greatest potential in our tuna industry.

 

And together we will build a fairer, sustainable and more profitable tuna sector.

 

I wish you all a successful, informative and productive forum and an enjoyable stay in Papua New Guinea.

 

I now declare open – the 06th Pacific Tuna Forum 2017.

 

Thank you.

Prime Minister – Peter O’Neill

BSP opens branch in Cambodia

By: Cedric Patjole – 26 May 2017
Bank South Pacific will be creating history when it enters the Asian market following the announcement of its new new branch in Cambodia.
This was revealed today during the announcing of the final dividend to shareholders for 2016 today.
The decision to enter Cambodia was settled on May 2nd this year.

BSP owns 50 per cent of an asset finance company called RMA Finance, which is now in the process of being rebranded to BSP Finance Cambodia Proprietary Limited.
“It’s already operating. We now own 50 per cent and the formal rebranding, hopefully by the end of July we’ll have the BSP colours proudly in Cambodia,” said BSP CEO Robin Fleming.

The new branch in Cambodia is part of BSP strategy to enter the Asian market following its successful penetration in the Pacific which it has successfully covered following its acquisition of Westpac’s assets in the region.
BSP Board Chairman Sir Kostas said other countries in BSP’s sights include Lao’s, Myanmar, and Vietnam which they hope to enter between 18 months to two years.
“We’re starting to do feasibility on these Laos, Myanmar, I mean these things don’t happen overnight. There’s a timeframe, we make sure we have all the ticks in the boxes first. Make sure all the regulatory requirements are satisfied and we proceed. 
But there is opportunity in these countries. That’s the main thing,” said Sir Kostas.

BSP is the largest business in PNG outside of companies in the resources sector.
The banking chain has seen remarkable growth, particularly over the last three years despite a tough economic environment.
The growth and performance is attributed to the management team and staff of the company.

Air Niugini Cup Launch

MEDIA RELEASE – AIR NIUGINI

This Sunday May 28th, 2017 will see SP PNG Hunters take on Townsville Blackhawks in Round 12 of the Queensland Intrust Super Cup competition at the National Football Stadium in Port Moresby.

And to commemorate the recently launched direct flights between Port Moresby and Townsville, Air Niugini has put up the perpetual Air Niugini Cup to be played for between the SP Hunters and Townsville Blackhawks.

“The inaugural Air Niugini Cup will be played for by the two teams in Port Moresby this weekend,” Air Niugini CEO Simon Foo said.
“The Cup will be played for on an annual basis and will encourage our fellow country folk living in and around Townsville, supporters of the Blackhawks as well the business and corporate community. Not only will the focus be for this annual tournament, but the opportunity will be provided to travel on our direct flight on Friday, visit friends and families or do business on Saturday, watch the game on Sunday and return direct on Monday ,” he said.

Foo said this year’s Air Niugini Cup will pay tribute to the 75th Anniversary of the battle of Kokoda.

“Next year’s game and ensuing games will pay tribute to notable observances and causes so the Air Niugini Cup played for between these two teams will be special.”

Air Cup

PNGRFL CEO Reatau Rau was grateful for Air Niugini’s support to the SP Hunters as well as rugby league throughout the country.

“The curtain raiser on Sunday will see Digicel Cup teams Hela Wigmen and Rabaul Agmark Gurias go head to head and we thank Air Niugini for the special discount fares for supporters of these two teams to travel to Port Moresby. This is in addition to the support given for the Port Moresby – Townsville return fares and we are really appreciative and grateful for the support Air Niugini is giving,” Rau said.

He also expressed gratitude to the Chairman and CEO of the QRL for giving their blessing of the Air Niugini Cup.

The SP Hunters vs Townsville Blackhawks game is expected to be kicked off by Air Niugini Board chairman Sir Fredrick Reiher or CEO Simon Foo at 3pm on Sunday at the National Football Stadium in Port Moresby.

The gates will be opened at 12pm for the curtain racer to start at 12:45pm. Tickets are going for K20 (behind goal posts), K25 (Northern/Southern Stand), K30(Western / Eastern stand) and K50 for the grand stand. They can be purchased at Brian Bell Plaza, Brian Bell Home Centre, Vision City, Naked Fish, Big Rooster at Koki and Erima, Stop and Shop Waigani and Gerehu. Games day tickets can be purchased at the stadium.

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