Category Archives: Tourism

PNG an Official APEC Hosting Nation

By : Post Courier

 

PAPUA New Guinea is now officially an APEC hosting nation after Prime Minister Peter O’Neill met with all the 21 APEC economy leaders in Da Nang, Vietnam for the 2017 Summit.

The gavel and key were officially handed to PNG on Friday.

Preparation to host APEC – Asia-Pacific – Economic Co-operation Leaders’ Summit next year is well underway.

The leaders of the 21 APEC member economies who met for a week in Da Nang are determined to take bolder and sustained collective actions to inject new dynamism into APEC co-operation.

Leaders sought to formulate a shared vision for advancing APEC’s role as a driver of economic integration and growth, an incubator of ideas for economic co-operation, a coordinating mechanism of trade agreements, and a global leader in addressing pressing problems. These will be carried on as the discussion agenda in PNG when the country hosts APEC.

This is to better position people and businesses across the Asia Pacific to navigate complex and fundamental shifts in the regional and global landscapes, building on the half century of progress achieved through voluntary, non-binding, consensus-based co-operation between APEC economies that is well suited for today’s new realities.

“APEC has shown its dynamism, adaptability and flexibility towards changes,” Vietnam President Tran Dai Quang, chair of the APEC Economic Leaders’ Meeting, said.

“The Bogor Goals of free and open trade and investment, and the support for the multilateral trading system, as well as the growth of connectivity strategies and programs have provided the long-term orientations for APEC’s activities and afforded hundreds of concrete cooperation areas, including next-generation trade and investment issues.

“These have also responded to the new demands of the digital era. Yet, regional economic integration has been impeded by global uncertainties facing free and open trade,” he said.

President Quang pointed to unfolding world security and economic and social transition challenges that threaten the momentum of trade and growth recovery.

“Within a year since our last meeting in Peru, we have witnessed changes more rapid and complex than we expected,” he said.

“This requires APEC to uphold its leadership in finding new drivers for growth, trade, investment, connectivity and in finding ways to ensure that the benefits of globalisation and economic integration are equally distributed.”

Leaders are exchanging their views on how APEC can promote balanced, inclusive, sustainable, innovative and secure growth and employability; create new drivers for regional economic integration, strengthen the capacity and innovation of micro, small and medium enterprises, and enhance food security and sustainable agriculture in response to climate change, he said.

“Only by so doing, can we contribute to a peaceful, stable, dynamic, interconnected and prosperous Asia-Pacific,” President Quang said.

PM O’Neill Arrives in Vietnam for APEC Summit

**** – Key Focus is on Enhancing Growth in Developing Economies ****

Apec - vietname2

The Prime Minister, Hon. Peter O’Neill CMG MP, has arrived in the city of Da Nang, in Viet Nam, for the 2017 APEC Leaders’ Summit.
On his arrival, the Prime Minister highlighted the importance of the APEC policy agenda that will help boost growth in key sectors of the Papua New Guinea economy.
“APEC is an important forum for growth and development in our region, and in the coming year will be even more important for Papua New Guinea when we host Leaders from around the region.
“The whole focus of the APEC Leaders’ Week is to strengthen our capacity to trade and to grow our economies.
“Through APEC we have the opportunity to generate more business, and that in turn creates more jobs.
“As a developing economy in APEC, Papua New Guinea also has the opportunity to strengthen capacity and skills in key sectors around the country.
“APEC is more than a single meeting each year, but it has a broad agenda covering agriculture, fisheries, women in the economy, transport and many other sectors that are vital for Papua New Guinea’s growth.
“Ultimately our work through APEC in these sectors is delivering direct benefits for our people.
“This APEC meeting will have a strong focus on adopting better digital technologies.
“For Papua New Guinea, expanding into the digital age, particularly for remote and rural communities is very important.”
The week-long series of APEC meetings also includes the 2017 APEC CEO Summit at which the Prime Minister will deliver an address.
“We have a number of Papua New Guinea business leaders who have come to Vietnam with our delegation.
“At the APEC CEO Summit our business representatives will be working to build better links with companies in Viet Nam and around the region.”
The Prime Minister is accompanied by the Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade, Hon. Rimbink Pato MP, and APEC Minister, Hon. Justin Tkatchenko MP.

Clearing a Pathway for Tourism in PNG

By : Post Courier

 

Understanding the potential market size of niche markets gives a clear pathway to planning how the tourism industry needs to develop its services, infrastructure, itineraries and marketing campaigns to attract new tourists says Jerry Agus, CEO of Tourism Promotion Authority.

“PNG offers a host of products and attractions that can meet the needs of these high-spending niche market travelers,” he added.

With international arrivals in PNG growing by an average of 13% since 2002, the International Visitor Survey shows that tourists have contributed $105 million to the economy in the first half of 2017. Given the numbers, targeting a niche market can prove to be timely for PNG’s tourism sector.

This is according to a report set to be launched in November. The data will be used to help PNG develop its tourism industry.

IFC’s tourism project in Papua New Guinea is focused on supporting the development of tourism businesses, improving tourism-related conditions, and helping to attract investment in the tourism sector.

Hope For Culture To Thrive as Artefact Returns To House

By REBECCA KUKU ( The National )

 

Restoring cultural decorations of the National Parliament will ensure that the younger generation will not forget their roots, says Grand Chief Sir Micheal Somare.

Sir Michael said the decorations signified the diverse culture of the people of Papua New Guinea and showed their unity in the Parliament House.

He said people must understand the value of the artefacts and know that not only were they a source of decoration but a form of our cultural heritage.

“As we transit into the modern world, the decorations in Parliament will be a reminder of who we were.

“Future generations will see it and ask why the decorations were there and the story will be retold of people with diverse cultures who united to become one country, Papua New Guinea.”

Somare said with over 800 languages and different cultures in the country, it was important that we preserve our history.

“In the 80s when we wanted to build the National Parliament, we wanted it to be a monumental statement that captured the diversity of our cultural heritage,” he said.

“When the constitution was written, people from all over the country were consulted.

“We decorated the Parliament House with cultural decorations from across the nation to show the world who we were, that despite the many different cultures we had united to become one country,” he said.

Sir Michael said that the decorations were a form of identification for the people.

“I am happy that the decorations will be restored but I am also sad because the fact remains that some of those craftsman who designed and created those decorations are no longer with us,” he said.

“And those artefacts that were damaged may not be restored to their original phase.”

APEC Has Benefits, Says Minister

By : Post Courier

Transport Minister Westly Nukundj has assured the country on the importance of APEC, that its costs will be worth it in the end.

He said major benefits to the country will not be seen on the surface of the meet, but in the various agreements that will be made between PNG, as the host country, and various members of the APEC family.

He said despite criticism aimed against the Government, bilateral agreements will be forged for assistance and investments that would not have come about without the meet.

Mr Nukundj said this during the 10th Transport Ministers Meeting (TMM10) held in Port Moresby, last weekend.

“We get a lot of criticisms that we are wasting a lot of money on such meetings like TMM10 and also the 2018 APEC Leaders’ Summit.”

“I can assure you that this is not a waste, where we get all the economies and why is it held here in a small country like Papua New Guinea when it should be held in countries like Australia.”

“Some people we need to change our mentality of thinking and reasoning.”

Mr Nukundj gave indication of talks regarding new port developments in the country discussed with APEC members.

“For instance like we met with Chinese Taipei and I indicated to them the need for us to have new ports.”

“We currently need four ports, one in Western Province, one for Wewak, Vanimo and the other one Manus.”

“But who is going to build it? The government is encouraging people to grow oil palm but facilities are not there to export.”

“With the exposure we are getting a lot of experience and knowledge and assistance from the economies that are taking part in the TMM10,” Nukundj said.

PNG PM’s 13 ready

By ISAAC LIRI ( The National )

THE Papua New Guinea Prime Minister’s 13 team for Saturday’s annual rugby league fixture against Australia was finalised yesterday.

Coach Stanley Tepend, pictured, was given the honour of naming the National Gaming and Control Board-sponsored 18-man side in place of head coach Michael Marum who is committed to preparations for the SP PNG Hunters’ Q-Cup grand final in Brisbane on Sunday.

The team was named in the presence of Sports Vice-Minister Wesley Raminai, naming rights sponsor National Gaming Control Board chief executive officer Imelda Agon, and PNG Rugby Football League chairman Sandis Tsaka. “I think the selectors have done a good job giving me a good side to work with. We have a couple of debutants and a couple of experienced players. We are also fortunate to have a couple of Hunters players,” Tepend said.

Knowing the massive task at hand with the Australian PM’s 13 consisting of great NRL players aiming to impress Australian Kangaroos coach Mal Meninga for a spot in the 2017 Rugby League World Cup, Tepend was confident his players would rise to the occasion.

“We are expecting a really tough match. We are working hard to match them and we know it won’t be easy, but our players have passion to play for their country,” he said. “I think we just have to prepare menatlly with the short period of time given. Our players know how to play and anything can happen. We will just have to work to our strengths.

“It’s always a challenge playing Australia because you’re up against the world’s best players but it’s also an opportunity for our boys.”

The only omission to the extended squad named last week was former Kumul forward Timothy Lomai ruled out with a shoulder injury.

Chairman Tsaka said he was confident in the side made up of Digicel Cup talent.

Vice-minister Raminai reminded the players that giving their best was what was expected.

Raminai announced five-eighth Charlie Simon as the side’s captain.

Meanwhile, the Australian PM’s 13 and Jillaroos teams arrive in Port Moresby this afternoon.

The Jillaroos are due in at 12.35pm with the Meninga’s PM’s 13 due in from Cairns at 1.10pm.

Both teams will enter through the ceremonial park for the public to greet them.

A media conference will be held at Stanley Hotel where the coach Meninga and captain Aaron Woods and Jillarros coach Brad Donald and captain Ruan Simms will attend.

They will be joined by coach Tepend and captain Simon and Oil Search PNG Orchids coach Dennis Miall and captain Cathy Neap.

All four teams will attend dinner at the Crowne Plaza tomorrow night to raise funds for the Orchids.

The teams will conduct coaching clinics tomorrow morning at the National Football Stadium. The theme for this year’s matches is “Strong men respect women”.

This is will be the Jillaroos’ first visit to PNG while the Orchids will make history by playing their first ever game.

PNG PM’s 13: 1. Joe Joshua (Tigers) 2. Brendan Gotuno (Vipers) 3. Stanford Talitha (Wigmen) 4. Junior Rau (Wigmen) 5. Karo Kauna Jr (Hunters) 6. Jason Missian (Gurias) 7. Charlie Simon – captain (Tigers) 8. Junior Rop (Tigers) 9. Stanley Olo (Gurias) 10. Dilbert Isaac (Gurias) 11. Tuvi Lepan (Gurias) 12. Kato Ottio (Mounties, NSW) 13. John Andy (Tigers); Reserves: 14. Sailas Gahuna (Hunters) 15. William Mone (Hunters) 16. Eddie Daffa (Lahanis) 17. Muka Peter Kulu (Hunters) 18. Joshua Nane (Mioks).

Pacific Tuna Forum – O’Neill speech

 

At the 6th Pacific Tuna Forum

 

Under the theme:

“Fostering Greater Social, Economic and Financial Benefits – Through Sustainable Management and Development of Tuna Resources”

 

13 September 2017

 

Good Morning,

 

It is a pleasure for Papua New Guinea to host this very prestigious 6th Pacific Tuna Forum.

 

Tuna is indeed the natural resource that binds the peoples and Governments of the Pacific Islands together.

 

Tuna is also the major revenue earner for many of our Governments in the Pacific, and for some, it is their single source of revenue.

 

The importance placed on this resource cannot be overstated.

 

Even back in the 1970s, one of the main policy agendas of many Governments was co-operation together to manage their tuna resources.

 

This bi-annual Pacific Tuna Forum is an initiative of the Papua New Guinea Government, through the National Fisheries Authority, when it was first held here in 2007.

 

Today, it is held in Partnership with INFO-FISH, and our Regional Fisheries Management Organizations.

 

This 3rd forum to be hosted in Papua New Guinea, and also includes the inaugural fishery technology expo that was held yesterday.

 

This forum is a premier tuna industry meeting in the Pacific region.

 

I welcome all policy makers, fishery managers, NGOs and industry leaders from around the world, who are with us here today.

 

The theme of this Forum, focusing on “Greater Social, Economic and Financial Benefits Through Sustainable Management” is very timely.

 

This theme also resonates quote well with the theme of the 48th Pacific Islands Forum in Apia last week, that very much focused on sustainable development, management and conservation of the Blue Pacific.

 

At the Leaders’ meetings in Apia, we urged the establishment and mainstreaming of regional Minimum Terms and Conditions in all areas of investment and development.

 

This includes a focus on the environment, and compliance across all marine sectors, particularly fisheries.

 

We are placing our support behind a number of initiatives and export standards.

 

This includes Competent Authorities and Catch Documentation Schemes in our region’s small Island economies.

 

As a region we have access to over 50 percent of world tuna supplies.

 

However, the major markets for tuna are not within our region.

 

Papua New Guinea, through the National Fisheries Authority, recognised the importance of expanding our markets.

 

We have established a Trade Lobby Committee which is comprised of both Government and industry representatives.

 

The aim of this committee is to explore and develop new markets.

 

We must be proactive, and go out and look for markets for our fisheries products if we are to have a viable industry into the future.

 

But Pacific Island Nations need to maintain focus on what we must do to ensure we have a viable fisheries sector for our children and their futures.

 

We are building upon the 2016 Forum Communique calling for all high seas bunkering of purse seiners – to be forced into our zones and under license.

 

As part of this, we must broaden this to include long line transhipping and bunkering operations.

 

We have to work together to further prevent illegal activities.

 

Building upon the success of PNA nations in managing the purse seine fishery, we further urge Small Island Nations to use their strength in number, for greater leverage on their interests and to safeguard the interests of our countries.

 

As Pacific Island States we need to steer our destiny in zone and in self-determination, and ensure benefits go to the people and economies.

 

We must do this rather than struggle with external dictates by those believing they have paternalistic rights to our fish and our waters.

 

Overall we need to strengthen Pacific solidarity in ensuring collective efforts for joint initiatives for improved ownership, participation and returns from the Blue Pacific.

 

This needs to be through specific initiatives in the sectors such as fishing, processing, transport, trade, and food security.

 

We can build upon the successes of our regional brand for niche products, and ensure that we have the right standards.

 

I urge that we ensure that our operators are provided with more opportunities and supported by the government in the sector.

 

This can be support through the development of partner funded initiatives, so we are not just seeing 100% foreign ventures promoted in these sectors throughout the region.

 

We need genuine joint ventures.

 

We also encourage PPP initiatives, especially in port services, processing and cold store infrastructure development.

 

In my view there is has great potential for our economies, particularly in port waste management for the sector, and this has the added benefit of helping to preserve the natural environment.

 

We need to develop more downstream processing and provide more spin-off business opportunities for our people.

 

All too often we see the tuna sector that is alienating itself from pour people, and particularly our SMEs.

 

We must create more opportunities so that is industry can continue to provide, more support for labour mobility, and making sure that there are more income-earning opportunities for our coastal communities throughout the Pacific Island Nations.

 

These untapped resources, and the opportunities that are available, must be accessed at sea and onshore.

 

Our Government today, is taking a stand against those non-preforming ventures.

 

We are now going to review over the next three months.

 

We are going to review many of these ventures, and the agreements that we have, because as I said at the Pacific Islands’ Forum last week.

 

For far too long in our region, we see ventures that continue to never make profits, Maurice Brown-John said in Apia last week, they never want to leave either.

 

That is why, enough-is-enough.

 

It is time to stop playing these kind of games.

 

It is important that benefits are shared equally, and fairly, so that our people benefit from the resources that they truly own.

 

Our Government is continuing to undertake the responsibility to continue to build good public infrastructure, and provide more training, and tax incentives that will continue to strengthen the industry as we have done in the past.

 

Papua New Guinea has subsidised this industry over the past decade, almost to the tune of almost 1 billion US Dollars.

 

This is by way of concessional fishing rights, in addition to many other generous concessions to the fishing industry.

 

But the reality this hardly adds to the production output that we have sought to achieve.

 

So we can ask where are the results from the investment that the country has been making?

 

We only see market share eroding, for example countries are having access to the markets that are usually reserved for countries like Papua New Guinea, where the tuna originates.

 

So in countries like Germany, they are achieving market share of close to 40 per cent, from exports that come from Papua New Guinea and the Pacific region.

 

This is unacceptable to countries like ours, because it erodes the market share for our people and our country.

 

That is why it is important that we go back and review some of the agreements, where we are not seeing processing plants that are not even running up to 75 per cent capacity that is required to hold a license in the industry.

 

We have a scenario where only 1 in 5 fish, that our Government has subsidised, is actually processed in Papua New Guinea.

 

Only 1 in 3, or even 1 in 4 jobs to process the catch are in Papua New Guinea.

 

In reality it means that almost 80% of the benefits from Papua New Guinea, are actually enjoyed by other countries.

 

That is why PNG flagged vessels, that fish our waters today, who enjoy the discounts, and yet have not landed a single fish to our processors in 2 years will be held to account.

 

This is simply not acceptable.

 

Our Government will implement changes.

 

They will make the review, and by 2018 I expect that this scenario will change.

 

We will increase rewards and support to direct to those who are genuine in the industry, who are genuine in wanting to process the fish in Papua New Guinea.

 

Let me state again, we welcome genuine investors, but those who are only here for cheap fishing are welcome to leave.

 

Our Government is committed to building the necessary support infrastructure.

 

We will create facilities so that fishing men and women, and processors are able to bring fish into ports in a timely manner, can process them at a reasonable cost.

 

We are exploring funding options for the Wagang Port, a dedicated fisheries port in Lae.

 

We want this critical infrastructure to commence construction soon.

 

As many of you will know the Government of Papua New Guinea proposed the Pacific Marine Industrial Zone in Madang as a regional tuna processing hub.

 

We will continue to pursue this project.

 

There is no easy way and there are no shortcuts in building a truly robust and competitive fisheries industry together.

 

We need to build competitiveness by increasing productivity and reducing costs of production.

 

During this term of Government, the policies and the achievements of the PNG fisheries sector will be measured against the regional benchmark.

 

This will be as outlined in the regional roadmap for sustainable fisheries.

 

We will continue to pursue onshore investment so that we can support these policies, and work with processors towards meeting their processing capacities.

 

Our Government is committed to making this happen, and will work with all stakeholders, especially our locally based fishing and processing industries.

 

We have the greatest potential in our tuna industry.

 

And together we will build a fairer, sustainable and more profitable tuna sector.

 

I wish you all a successful, informative and productive forum and an enjoyable stay in Papua New Guinea.

 

I now declare open – the 06th Pacific Tuna Forum 2017.

 

Thank you.

Prime Minister – Peter O’Neill

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