Tag Archives: Districts

106 Districts Fail to Aquit K1.1 Billion

May 31, 2017

BY MICHAEL ARNOLD

A total of 106 provinces and districts have failed to acquit for the funding that they received from the disbursement of SIP funding last year.

Reports from the Department of Implementation and Rural Development (DIRD) have shown that out of the 22 provinces and 89 districts in PNG, only five have submitted their acquittals and annual reports for the K1.11 billion released for the District Services Improvement Program (DSIP) and Provincial Services Improvement Program (PSIP) last year.

Only 5 out of 106 have acquitted for SIP funds

According to DIRD acting deputy secretary, Aihi Vaki, there has been a steep decline in the submission of annual reports and acquittals for DSIP and PSIP funding over the past four years.

“In 2013, we had 92 acquittals submitted and 19 not submitted. In 2014, we had 75 submitted and 36 not submitted. In 2015 we had 36 submitted and 75 not submitted and this year we have only received five so far. So you can now see the trend is that over this period, the acquittals and the level of reporting is dropping,” said Mr Vaki

“Although we have seen some development since the DSIP program was first implemented in the 2008 National Budget, irregular payments, and the non-submission of annual reports and acquittals have made both the DSIP and PSIP increasingly difficult to manage.

“It is not the sitting members fault. This is supposed to be the district administrators’ responsibility. But as the chairpersons of their respective District Development Authority (DDA) boards, they need to push for submission of acquittals because we need those reports,” Mr Vaki said.

It has become readily apparent that more stringent and transparent measures need to be taken in order to account for the sheer mass of funding that is being drawn down for DSIP and PSIP funding every year.

Tax payers deserve to know where their money is going and whether or not they are directly benefitting from it.

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Leadership Needed to Maintain Services

 May 26, 2017KIRIWINA-GOODENOUGH

BY LEONNIE WAYANG

Basic government services like health, education and infrastructure are continuing programs that leaders have to implement.

Kiriwina-Goodenough MP, also Minister for Forest, Douglas Tomuriesa, said it is not so much the completion of these programs but their maintenance.

“We have started a lot of programs and I’m confident of coming back to continue these programs; not so much on completing them but to keep them going like health, education programs and infrastructure development programs in the electorate, which are important.”

“You cannot complete those programs, those are continuing programs,” he said.

“They are government-funded programs, and all they needed is leadership to keep 

them going,” Mr Tomuriesa said.

“I’ve done what I had to do in the last five years. Sometimes you cannot do everything in one go, but we’ve started off somewhere.”

Mr Tomuriesa said when he took office in 2012, there was no five-year development plan available.

“I found there was no five-year development plan.”

“So the first thing we did was work on a five-year development plan; and based on this development plan, we were able to achieve some of the things that we have done.”

“If you look at my election poster, the 10 policies I have basically covers the five-year development plan itself.”

“Last year, I revised the five-year development plan, and it’s now a 10-year development plan,” he added.

Govt Heads urged to visit Rural Areas

By : Post Courier

Chief Secretary to government Isaac Lupari has told departmental heads at the second department heads meeting that they have a purpose for going to rural parts of the country for their meeting.

The meeting was held at Keapara village in Rigo district, Central Province and attended by 70 heads and senior staff of departments, statutory agencies, state-owned enterprises and constitutional offices.

“We often design and develop policies and plans from Waigani without fully understanding the challenges and needs of 80 per cent of our people who live in the rural settings of our country,” Mr Lupari said.

“As a result many of these policies and plans have failed in the past, which has resulted in wastage of millions of kina.”

Mr Lupari urged everyone to not make the same mistake, learn from past experiences and continue to chart and develop a new part for service delivery.

“If we do not, it will be a great injustice to our people and the next generation, who are children,” he said.

gvt

“The O’Neill Government’s policies are rural-focused and aimed at improving the rural settings and deliver vital services to the people.

“Going rural and coming to Keapara village gives us a great opportunity to see how services are delivered so that we can improve it.

Mr Lupari said the visit allows heads of departments; statutory agencies and SOEs to see things for themselves, listen to the people’s stories of the types of challenges they go through every day of their lives, and what their needs are.

“This is critically important so we can be able to improve on the policy settings and recalibrate service delivery methods and mechanisms to better deliver services.”

Mr Lupari urged heads of departments, statutory agencies and SOEs who stayed for the night activities with the community to use the opportunity for frank discussions with the people of Keapara, Karawa and Alukuni.

“We are their servant, and let’s work to improve the lives of our people.”